Archive | March 2013

Create visual effects with coloured water and Arduino

 After seeing the effect of water being vibrated as it came out of a hose, Arduino forum member “focalist” decided to create his version using an Arduino, a servo and some simple circuitry. By adding fluorescent colouring to water which is then passed through a tube with the end controlled by a servo, it can be seen at night when a blacklight is shined on the liquid. Then with the Arduino commanding the servo, various effects can be generated, for example:

 

That’s a whole box of awesome, so head over to the Arduino forum for more information and discussion. And for more, we’re on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

If you found the project above interesting – but not sure how to start with Arduino – then the best way to learn is with our Experimenter’s Kit for Arduino:

The package includes a wide variety of parts, sensors and modules including: a servo motor, lights, buttons, switches, sound, sensors, breadboard, wires and more. Furthermore a Freetronics Eleven Arduino-compatible board is included to make this an extensive hobby experimenter, inventor and starter kit. However we don’t leave you alone to figure it all out, included is a great project and instruction booklet, plus access to a supporting web page and software examples. In other words – this is everything you need to get started for a fun range of electronics and Arduino related projects! 

So to get started or for more information and to order, check out the product page.

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Send email or SMS with Arduino and Google App engine

Although originally designed for an aquaponics system, Instructables user “IAquaponics” has published a great tutorial describing the hardware and software required for an Arduino to send email or SMS text messages using python, the Google App python SDK and a Ubuntu OS computer. The ability to send an SMS will be determined by carrier availability in your area however the explanation of the code and the total design is very well articulated, deserving a read for at least interests’ sake. 

So to get started, check out the tutorial from here. And for more, we’re on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

If you’re looking for an Ethernet-enabled Arduino-compatible board, consider one of Ethernet-enabled boards, such as the Freetronics EtherTen – the Arduino Uno-compatible with onboard Ethernet, microSD socket and optional PoE:

… or for more program space, I/O ports consider the Freetronics EtherMega – the Arduino Mega2560-compatible with onboard Ethernet, microSD socket and optional PoE:

3D-printed enclosure for Freetronics EtherTen

 If you’re looking for an enclosure for your Freetronics EtherTen board, and have access to a 3D printer – then this enclosure published on Thingiverse may be for you. Created by Andrew Gemmell the enclosure allows for wall-mounting and space for another protoshield on the EtherTen. And the M3 bolts at the end add a snazzy technical finish as well:

Kudos to Andrew for publishing his work, and the design files can be found on Thingiverse. And for more, we’re on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

 

So what is a Freetronics EtherTen? It’s a great board that saves you space, time and money – it combines an full Arduino Uno-compatible board, an Ethernet shield, a microSD socket and the option of using power over Ethernet – all on one board. For more information and to order – click here!

Control Futaba S-BUS devices with Arduino

The Futaba company (popular for remote-control devices, servos and so on) has a control bus for their newer products that allows an easier method of wiring multiple servos, batteries, controllers and so on – called the “S-BUS”. Being a proprietary system you’d be stuck with their parts – however enthusiast Michael Baker has worked on the reverse-engineering of the bus – and created some example sketches and an Arduino library to allow control of the Futaba devices with an Arduino. 

 

Well done to Michael and all those who contributed to the project. For more discussion, library and notes visit the Arduino forum. And we’re on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

When prototyping more advanced Arduino-based projects, you’ll need a protoshield to mount the external circuitry. In doing so, consider our range of ProtoShields. From the tiny LeoStick to the Mega range, we offer a complete range for you to work with.

Networked Arduino control via MATLAB

Amongst the multitude of things you can do with MATLAB software is the ability to remotely control an Arduino board via Ethernet. With the included code you can create a visual interface to simply control Arduino digital outputs, and expand on them with your own requirements. Although the project uses a separate Arduino Ethernet shield you could also use an integrated board such as an EtherTen.

An interesting and useful example for MATLAB users out there – click here to get started. And for more, we’re on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

If you’re looking for an Ethernet-enabled Arduino-compatible board, consider one of Ethernet-enabled boards, such as the Freetronics EtherTen – the Arduino Uno-compatible with onboard Ethernet, microSD socket and optional PoE:

… or for more program space, I/O ports consider the Freetronics EtherMega – the Arduino Mega2560-compatible with onboard Ethernet, microSD socket and optional PoE:

The LASERino laser staging box project

As we often say you can do a lot with an Arduino and the following project is a great example of this. Arduino forum member “rediculum” is working on a staging box to control a 20mW laser that will generate various lighting effects. It uses a system of servo-controlled mirrors to alter the laser reflection and thus the resulting patterns, and after final construction will end up cheaper than a commercial unit. Here’s an example of the current work in action:

 

It’s a work in progress, however the project is being documented very well, and you can follow to find the results from here. And for more, we’re on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

To get started with your own projects based on a miniature Arduino-compatible – look no further than the Freetronics LeoStick. Apart from being one of the smallest Arduino-compatibles on the market with USB, it also has an onboard RGB LED and piezo for sound and knock detection:

An Arduino NFC time clock project

Michael Paholski was tasked with creating a modern rendition of an employee punch-clock, and turned to Arduino as the base for his solution. By using a Freetronics EtherTen, an after market NFC shield and related circuitry his goal has been successful. Over various articles the project is described from the idea phase through to the culmination of the final product. When completed it can record the card data, the direction of entry on the card and alter this, and send required data to an external database. 

It’s an interesting and useful project to follow, so for more information start here. And for more, we’re on twitter and Google+, so follow us for news and product updates as well.

If you found the project above interesting – but not sure how to start with Arduino – then the best way to learn is with our Experimenter’s Kit for Arduino:

The package includes a wide variety of parts, sensors and modules including: a servo motor, lights, buttons, switches, sound, sensors, breadboard, wires and more. Furthermore a Freetronics Eleven Arduino-compatible board is included to make this an extensive hobby experimenter, inventor and starter kit. However we don’t leave you alone to figure it all out, included is a great project and instruction booklet, plus access to a supporting web page and software examples. In other words – this is everything you need to get started for a fun range of electronics and Arduino related projects! 

So to get started or for more information and to order, check out the product page.